Wolfman Reversed: A Wolfie Revision of the Werewolf Archetype

Today’s poem is the mirror alternative to the stereotypical werewolf transformation, which has previously been covered in a poem on this poetry website: Stereotypical Werewolf Transformation.

Poem Explanation

The new Joe Johnston directed werewolf film, Wolfman, is another chapter in the traditional film treatment of the human-wolf relationship.

This poem basically reverses the stereotype of wolf attacking human; turning victims into werewolf killing machines. The poem tries to provide a mirror image of the werewolf relationship between human and wolf.

Its inspiration is the true relationship between human and wolf, and questions about which creature really seems like the monster between the two, when you look at how each has treated the other during their time together.

Although wolves are obviously carnivores, wolf attacks on humans are very rare, and there has apparently never been such an attack by a healthy wolf in North America. Meanwhile, humans have been massacring wolves for centuries, and the killing still continues despite wolves being eliminated from great swathes of land bordering ‘civilisation’.

Poem Structure

The poem mirrors in words per line from the outers to the middle line, with a structure of:

7-6-9-5-5-5 (11) 5-5-5-9-6-7

The Poem

The Reverse Werewolf Transformation

wild wolf partly eaten by a human
I know it sounds pretty gruesome
got my leg half bitten and lost two paws
surely there should be laws
to protect wolves like me
from this kind of atrocity

next full moon I fail to howl for the first time

my voice has no harmony
no more freedom for me
stumbling around without a pack
I wish I could have the old times back
now I’m a shackled city stray
lost my company and somewhere to play


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