Pagan Films and Book Writing

Hi, it’s Greenygrey. I’ve returned to the U.K. today, but zipped ahead of myself last night for a run in the sun, after seeing on the weather forecast that I’d be dominating the landscape today and most of the weekend. Today we’ve got another Werewolf of Oz episode, after talking pagan films, writing chapter fillers and The Code numerical twists.

Pagan-Monotheism Realistic Greenygrey Movie 

International Poster "Vahalla Rising"...
International Poster “Vahalla Rising” Mads Mikkelsen Jamie Sives (Photo credit: sweetonsigmafilms)

Talking of greenygrey dominating the landscape, our film correspondent, Quentin Tarwolftino alerted us to greenygrey dominating the landscape in Valhalla Rising, which is available to watch on BBC iplayer (only in the U.K. unfortunately) until Sunday.

The film provides a realistic portrayal of the clash between paganism and monotheism a millenium ago; we like to think that the dominant greenygrey with a little yellowyblue landscape was instrumental in creating its realism.

While we relate to its historic warrior paganism, we don’t want a return to those times of conflict and war, and think that a more feminine new-age-paganism is the best way ahead for Britain and the world: humanity, environment and wildlife.

Apologies to Marc Latham WOOZ COVER 4

First of all today I’d like to apologise to Marc Latham about criticising his leaving place names out of the notes when he was editing Grey’s great fantasy travel quest. While I was checking the Smashwords copy I noticed Marc did write in the book preface that place names were mostly real, and those that weren’t real would be explained.

Having said that, I think that for this serialisation of the book it’s better that connections are explained more clearly. For example in this episode, that the Railway Hotel is a real place in Castlemaine, and that’s the connection-inspiration for the Railroad Song being played.

While you may think book writing and publishing is easy work; and it is more pleasurable than most jobs in my experience; there’s a lot of thought and time needed to get it as correct as possible. This ‘quick blog’ was meant to have a paragraph or two introduction, but now has ten or twelve; and it and all its extras will take about two hours!

Narcissus
Narcissus (Photo credit: pogobee)

While we write with care and love for our work, you may decode it as soft sell egotistical ramblings; and maybe there’s truth in both… in line with Greenygrey theory…

Werewolf of Oz Catches Its Breath… Good for You Too 

After the run, the above introduction, and what I consider a Magnificent Seven classic comedy satire fantasy travel quest episodes of Werewolf of Oz: Fantasy Travel by Google Mapswhich is now not only available on Amazon for paperbacks and the Kindle Ereader but on Smashwords for other Ereaders; I’m quite relieved that today’s episode is a bit of a filler lull… but this blog could now be considered a classic!?

Before you think the Werewolf of Oz is bad value for money because it has filler chapters, this is a common technique in book writing. It allows character development, the back story to be told, and the readers to catch their breath. I just googled it, and this was the best ‘Writing “Filler” Chapters‘ result I found on the first page.

Railroad songs
Railroad songs (Photo credit: tannersjackson)

However, although it’s not a classic chapter/episode, hopefully you’ll find it quite enjoyable. And I think you will if you’re a Lynyrd Skynyrd rock band, Castlemaine beer or town, The Code documentary or Greenygrey Combination Colour fan… it also hopefully provides a little comedy.

My favourite little twist was the way Angry wanting two beers meant the beer order was 6-4-5 in a chapter/episode built around The Code documentary. The programme was about how some mathematical equations seem to dominate nature.

79.  RAILROAD SONG IN THE RAILWAY HOTEL, CASTLEMAINE BEER IN CASTLEMAINE

After the meal and passer-by had left us dazed and confused, we decided a drink or three was needed. So we headed up to Castlemaine and chose the Railway Hotel because it reminded us of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Railroad Song. We ordered six 4Xs for the five of us, because Angry wanted two.

The Code

Space-filling model of the chlorophyll a molec...
Space-filling model of the chlorophyll a molecule, the most common form of chlorophyll, the green pigment that all plants use for photosynthesis, and one of the most important chemicals in nature. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It was a quiet afternoon, and our finking was frankly frazzled, so we lounged around watching a documentary called The Code.

It argued that there were numbers naturally embedded in nature, and that some numbers seem especially common and important.

I wondered if green and grey would be a top colour combination in a similar study on colours. I didn’t say anything to the others because I thought it might sound supercilious; be treated as super silly, and not be taken super seriously.

We didn’t overdo the beer this time, and all left the bar compos mentis.

—————————————————————————————————-

Notes 

There is a Railway Hotel in the centre of Castlemaine, Victoria.
Railroad Song is a classic Lynyrd Skynyrd hobo travel song.
Dazed and Confused is a Led Zeppelin song.
The Code was a real documentary.
finking – thinking.
4x is a Castlemaine brewery beer.
–————————————————————————————————–

werewolf of oz book cover

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