Swan Lake Tragedy Bottlenose Dolphin Family

Dolphins seem to want to play all day
it’d be nice if we could leave them that way
respecting them as our intelligent aquatic cousins
and appreciate them teaching us marine biology lessons.

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Hi, it’s Greenygrey. It was great to return from a long weekend away yesterday and see a postcard that seems to bear ol’ Wolfhol’s distinctive and almost certainly impossible to forge signature on this blog.

Swan Lake Tragedy Alleviated by Comedy 

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It looks like he’s in a good proud peacock place, which along with the fun introductory poem is nice for today’s blog, as it features a sad episode of the usually satirical comedy literary nonsense filled Werewolf of Oz: Fantasy Travel by Google Maps.

However, as well as being a comedy classic it is also a travel quest epic, and as anybody acquainted with the genre knows, sometimes there’s just got to be a tragedy. And that’s what we have in this episode, a complete and utter unnecessary tragedy.

Hopefully we can learn some lessons from it. Moreover, there’s some great news about Barry the bottlenose dolphin from Kalbarri, called by Grey while passing the Western Australia coast, in tomorrow’s blog.

An adult female bottlenose dolphin with her yo...
An adult female bottlenose dolphin with her young, Moray Firth, Scotland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So please don’t feel sad tonight, as Barry and family are just a part of the Swan Lake tragedy, and there are many real dolphins in need of consideration and conservation every day.

Chapter 112.  Swan Lake Dolphin Tale Tragedy

I shapeshifted into human form after we moored on the edge of Swan Lake, and looked up the Swan Lake tale on Wikipedia before going to Cudmirrah with the people. Barry and family were happy to lounge in the lake.

Swan Lake Cudmirrah Swan Lake 

A man approached us on the edge of town and introduced himself as Prince Siegfried. I said I was pleased to meet him, but thought twice about that after his next words.

Pavel Gerdt as Prince Siegfried in the Petipa/...
Pavel Gerdt as Prince Siegfried in the Petipa/Ivanov revival of Swan Lake, St. Petersburg, 1895 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He said he was about to harpoon me when I was a dolphin; but then he saw me change into a human, and fell madly in love with me.

I thought this Cudmirrah Swan Lake situation could mirror the Swan Lake plot a little too much for my liking.

So I said I was just passing through, and although very flattered, wouldn’t be able to spend any time with him. He looked a tad disappointed, but seemed to accept it.

We continued into Cudmirrah, which is a lovely town in a beautiful setting, and stocked up on provisions for the onward journey.

We were about to leave the lake and head out to open sea, when we saw the prince dive into the far end of the lake. An older woman shouted, ‘Siegfried, no, don’t do it, come back.’

Swan Lake Tragedy

I was shocked, but didn’t want to get involved. Barry said he wanted to help, so he untied his harness, and started swimming toward the prince; his wife and children followed, hot on his tailfluke.

Engraving by J. H. Clark of the harpooning of ...
Engraving by J. H. Clark of the harpooning of a whale (c.1814) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We watched them closely, and paid a heavy price for it. For as our dolphin friends rose out of the water and into the air, half-way there, a salvo of harpoons landed all amongst and around them.

I finally broke free of my harness, and set off to look for our bottlenose buddies, but half-way there I saw them ascending into the ether; clicking and smiling with what looked like love, just the same as when they’d played in the water. It was a scene straight out of Swan Lake, literally and metaphorically.

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Notes

In Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake (1875-1876), Prince Siegfried falls in love with Odette, who is turned into a swan by sorcery. It was inspired by Russian folk tales.

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Link for Amazon book and kindle.
Link for multiple Ereaders at Smashwords.
Link for multiple Ereaders at Smashwords.
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