Bob Crow and Union Working Class Struggle

‘Twenty minutes later, Bob Crow pulled another one back with a short snap strike, leaving the Redbacks defence red-faced as well as red-backed.’

Bob Crow, Union Leader  Bob Crow.JPG

Bob Crow passed away yesterday morning. He was the General Secretary of the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT) and inspired the above Crow character in the Werewolf of Oz.

He was a good example of the working class battling to achieve, and help their fellow workers. If Britain hadn’t been divided by Thatcher and Blair, and profit and religion taken over from fairness and equality as the main political focuses, then maybe people like Bob Crow could have made Britain a more united kingdom.

Britain’s Future 

Bob Crow on strikes in the Guardian
Bob Crow on strikes in the Guardian (Photo credit: Annie Mole)

His critics argued that he was holding Britain back.

But was he holding Britain back from cheaper tube fares, or bigger bonuses for the big bosses after workers lost their jobs?

The next reflection from 242 Mirror Poems and Reflections commented on this, and seems a fitting post for a man who tried to help those struggling to survive in a rapidly changing country.

Reflection 4

The well-behaved British working class used to be known as ‘salt of the earth’ when they were compliant up to the 1950s, but not so much anymore.
Were things that different in history? I don’t know.
And have they changed that much? Well, elite corruption has been exposed more since the 1950s, making the workers less likely to trust and revere the upper classes; Thatcher decimated the working-class industries in the 1980s, destroying communities; and New Labour betrayed their traditional voters by squeezing them out of the workplace between high-earning elites and foreign workers willing to work for less.
So things have probably changed, but I don’t know how much, or if it is the main reason for there apparently being less ‘salt of the earth’.

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