Category Archives: Evolution of the Folding Mirror Form

Poetry Form Latest: Folding Mirror Evolution

Exciting news for the Folding Mirror form. It is the form of the week on Lewis Turco’s Odd and Invented Forms website, following its inclusion in the new version of the definitive Book of FormsThanks again to Lewis for using and publicising the form.
Also, thanks again to Caroline Gill, who alerted me to the above, and has been instrumental in clarifying and maintaining the form, and who features a new post about it on her Brekekekex Koax Koax blog.
English: Mirror, Mirror, on the Ground The pud...
English: Mirror, Mirror, on the Ground The puddle, on this stretch of Wolvens Lane, forms an effective mirror. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
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Warm Seasons Poem Celebrates Mirror Poetry Book

We’re delighted to report that 242 Mirror Poems and Reflections is now available in paperback on Amazon from the above link.
To celebrate, Marc Latham has written a new Folding Mirror poem covering the warm six months of the northern hemisphere’s 2012, when the book was finished and published.
In the poem, Marc keeps to the classic Folding Mirror form that has been maintained since 242, with not only the words in each half of the poem mirroring, but also the two halves of words in the middle line.  The four seasons, and eight months of warmth, are also included, and more or less mirror. Here’s the poem:
 Greeting Sunshine, Saying Goodbye
summer smiled in the springtime
June jumped the queue sublime
swapped places with March
without seeming to ask.
solar power was felt
enough for ice to melt
at times in April and May
whispering warmth was here to stay.
midsummer dawn, dusky latesummer
daylight decreased let sleeping dogs lie
Olympic spirit of August and July
rekindled fires of flaming idols
halcyon heats and finals.
eight months of calendar
crossed off means September
October fright light’s last flight
winter chills autumn at night.

Caroline Gill writes about Poetry Forms

As previously mentioned on this site, the Folding Mirror poetry form was included in the new Book of Forms, edited by Lewis Turco. One of the examples of an FM poem included in the book was by Caroline Gill, who has also provided a lot of expert advice and support for the establishment of the form and this site. Caroline recently blogged about the book on her Caroline at Coastcard site, and an extract is copied below with her permission.

Caroline Gill
Publication Pointer (2): The Book of Forms (4th edition) by Lewis Putnam Turco

Professor Lewis Turco’s work, The Book of Forms, is now available in its 4th Edition, published by the University Press of New England. This new ‘revised and expanded edition’ has as its subtitle, A Handbook of Poetics Including Odd and Invented Forms. 

A copy of the third edition (published in 2000) has long been my constant poetry companion. I have learned so much about what Professor Turco calls ‘the elements of poetry’, comprising ‘levels of language usage’. I have been fascinated by the plethora of covered forms, from one lineadonics to 210 lined sonnets redoubled.

The latest edition contains all these features plus added extras in the guise of ‘odd and invented forms’. If I home in on British contributions for a moment, you will find a description of Dr Marc Latham’s Folding Mirror Poetry, with an example by Claire Knight and a second one by yours truly.

Lewis Putnam Turco is an emeritus professor of English. He was the founding director of the Cleveland State University Poetry Center and of the Department of Creative Writing at the State University of New York College at Oswega. The new edition, with sample poems by established names like Robert Frost and newer names like Greg Pincus, can be purchased from UPNE: the details can be found here. You can read the reviews on Amazon here.

In drawing these thoughts to a close, I would also wish to express my thanks to those who create these new forms for us to enjoy. For after all …

“It can be argued that to invent a verse-form which becomes immortal,
living on in the works of future poets and in other languages,
is one of the greatest achievements possible for a poet …”  
Martin Lyon, ‘Acumen‘, issue 71 (Sept 2011), p.71 
http://carolinegillpoetry.blogspot.com/2012/01/publication-pointer-2-book-of-forms-4th.html

Folding Mirror Poets Featured on New Poem Forms Image

FMPoetry is proud to see two poets who have created Folding Mirror poems alongside many famous poets in an image on Lewis Turco’s Odd and Invented Forms blog. Caroline Gill and Claire Knight had Folding Mirror poems accepted for the new book of Odd and Invented Forms as examples of the Folding Mirror form.
Both poems were first featured on this site. Caroline Gill’s accepted poem was Thalatta, Thalatta; Claire Knight’s was Hourglass of Time. Thanks again to Lewis, Caroline and Claire for their creativity and time.
Here’s the image that appears on the Odd and Invented forms blog. Viewing it as a clock face, Caroline Gill is at about 5 o’ clock and Claire Knight is at about 9 o’ clock:

Poems on this Site (195) and New Poetry Books

Poetry is an...Hi, I just updated the poems on this site list, and it now stands at 195.
New Book by KJP Garcia
Several of the new entries were by KJP Garcia, who has now released a book of poetry.  More details at the kjpgarcia site.
New Book by Lewis Turco
Lewis Turco has also had a new book of poetry forms published, and includes the Folding Mirror form in it.  More details at the Lewis Turco poetry site.
Happy Holidays
Thanks to everybody who has supported this site through contributing or reading in 2011 and I hope you have a great holiday season.
Marc Latham’s central site is the Greenygrey (http://www.greenygrey.co.uk)

Poem about Middle-Age and Climbing Over the Hill

Two islands to the north west of continental E...
Image via Wikipedia
Marc Latham’s latest Folding Mirror poem is another jolly affair (joke). It is also quite topical, with work sparse in the UK and many middle-age jobless people said to be finding it hard to find work.
Marc Latham is himself middle-aged and not doing very well financially, so hopefully the poem won’t incur the wrath of his fellow poor middle-aged.
Marc couldn’t resist the greenygrey map by the way!
The structure provides something new in that it is to be read from the bottom up, in line with its title and content being about climbing over the hill, with ‘over the hill’ a common phrase to describe people being past it in the UK.
Climbing Over the Hill
Line 9
relax, relax, relax
Line 8
lounge, lounge, lounge
Line 7
survive, survive, survive
Line 6
not wanted, salvage anything, no joy
Line 5
Middle-age
Line 4
hold on, grab something, don’t fall
Line 3
strive, strive, strive
Line 2
work, work, work
Line 1
climb, climb, climb
 

Poem about Bipolar from Underground to Solar

In Thought
Image via Wikipedia
This poem by Marc Latham is quite an old one.  Marc held back on it as he thought it might be interpreted incorrectly, with readers thinking it made him sound all high and mighty.
It is in fact about the highs and lows of the bipolarity Marc thinks he’s had for a long time.  While the highs, or mania, can make you think you are in touch with special thoughts, the lows can make you think that life is completely futile and not worth bothering with.  Understanding what it is helps to weather the time spent on the fringes, and harness the creative thoughts the condition provides.
So while Marc guesses that most normal people, as only a small minority are supposed to be bipolar, have a much more rational or middle thought process, bipolar people spend more time on the edges of thought, where the rational gives way to the creative.
That’s probably why a lot of bipolar people seek release in creativity, while those with normal brain processes are happy in regular jobs.
Marc doesn’t think one is superior over the other, it is just a matter of different brains working differently, which also occurs in animals.
Grammatically, the poem is a little different to previous ones in that it has similar words ending and starting the lines in the two halves.
Anyway, here it is:

Mine Bipolar Mind 

high, high, high, look at my
mine mind as it fly
flies soaring at its peak
peaks and  glides, you wouldn’t speak
speaks to me, shouts to you
yours wouldn’t reach, my higher view
All is calm on the equator of the mind
You’ve got me, I’m feeling blue
blued by me, felled by you
your nightmare depths, I pass below
beneath normal limits of sorrow
sorrows and woes attacking mood
moody, moody, moody, backwards I stood