Category Archives: Greenygrey conservation

Koala, Dolphin, Baboon Photos Follow Google+ Research

Hi, it’s Baron Wolfman, head honcho of Greenygrey arts in the absence of Andy Wolfhol, who is still awol (that’s an acronym for ‘absent without official leave‘, rather than an abbreviation of ‘a werewolf’). They say a picture tells a thousand words, and I think that’s especially true of the greenygrey environment.

Follow Us To Google+ 

So instead of writing any more, here’s some photos I collected from Marc Latham’s Google+ profile for wolf -environment week. By the way, you can now follow Marc on Google+ from the badge at the bottom of this blog page.

We don’t ask you for much at the Greenygrey,
such as asking you to pay,
for the innovative information,
and exciting entertainment,
we poetically send your way.

Instant Research

I just let a teabag fall into the last tea at the bottom of my mug after thinking it might happen. Did I do it because:

  1. of stupidity?
  2. I took a risk it wouldn’t happen?
  3. I didn’t really care if the teabag dropped?
  4. all three of the above?

Oops, got distracted from the photos with more words. No more. On with some greenygrey environment photos:

Koala shared by Alonzo Guerrero
Born to be Greenygrey. Baby dolphin’s first request is to greenygrey. Shared by Gurdeep Singh.
Chilled-out baboon kicks back and enjoys the sunshine. Published on the Metro website.
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Tom Hardy in Africa, Thomas Hardy on Class

Hi, it’s Chris Packwolf, animal welfare correspondent at the Greenygrey; with Chris Packham a parallel for those reading this in the human world. As wolf week takes over from working-class week, yesterday the Greenygrey reported how Gemma Atkinson is a working-class woman animal welfare supporter and environmentally conscious. Tom Hardy stars today.

Atypical Animal Welfare Supporters 

Tom Hardy
Tom Hardy (Photo credit: honeyfitz)

Gemma is probably not the stereotypical animal welfare supporter, and neither is the actor Tom Hardy. Hardy is best known for being a bad boy celebrity, and playing baddie roles such as Bronson and Bane; as told in his biography. Bri’s bane was of course the ultimate Brisbane baddie at the end of Werewolf of Oz.

However, Tom Hardy this week starred in a documentary visiting Africa to report on the struggle to save elephants and rhinos from poachers in the first of the two-part Poaching Wars With Tom Hardy.

Use of Iconic Logos

lacoste
lacoste (Photo credit: Ozzam Escudero Ajihil)

Although it would be nice to raise awareness using just the animals, I think it sometimes needs stars and icons to attract new supporters. That’s why we have the greenygrey wolf as the logo for the Greenygrey website.

We could have chosen a less controversial animal, but felt that the wolf was right; and Lacoste hasn’t done too bad with the crocodile, which of course starred in the Werewolf of Oz pirate story. Crocodiles seem even less popular and iconic an animal to humans than our best friend dog’s close wild cousin.

Being True to Oneself 

"Thomas Hardy," oil on panel, by the...
“Thomas Hardy,” oil on panel, by the Scottish painter and engraver William Strang. 17 in. x 15 in. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Remembering working-class week and Tom Hardy above, the Greenygrey’s struggle between the human and wild animal world is reminiscent of Tom Hardy’s Victorian namesake writer Thomas Hardy’s struggle with class identity.

Thomas Hardy the writer found it difficult to live in upper class life after becoming a successful writer, and felt he would have to lose some of his good working-class qualities to be accepted into the upper echelons; where he would be able to fulfill his literary potential.

Working-Class Animal Welfare

I remember hearing a jokey observation that when the upper classes see a fox they hunt it; when the working-class see a fox they hit it on the head and eat it; when the middle-class see a fox they photograph it.

So although I am a working-class werewolf, in that respect I am more stereotypically middle-class.

Kes 1969 film poster.jpg
Kes’s 1969 film poster

Although vegetarianism and animal welfare support are more typically middle-class I do it out of a liking for animals and the environment rather than social factors. In fact, life would be much easier, and I would probably be more acceptable in my current life, if I did eat meat and not care so much about animals.

And in reality, I think animal lovers cross class and cultural boundaries. An early fictional example of a working-class person finding an interest in life through animals was Kes, a Ken Loach film adapted from the Barry Hines book A Kestrel for a Knave.

Whether it’s kestrels in Britain or elephants in Africa, the Greenygrey totally supports the efforts of animal welfare supporters to try and protect endangered animals for both the animals and humans; the world will be a much poorer place without all the animal species that brighten it with life.

Marc Latham has books available on Smashwords and Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/author/marclatham).

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Prince William CITES Conference and Polar Bears

Hi, it’s Chris Packwolf. I’m delighted to say that Marc Latham has published his fourth Suite 101 article of the long weekend. The final article covers the third episode of the wildlife documentary trilogy, when Gordon Buchanan and the film team followed the remaining members of the polar bear family through autumn/fall. Did Lyra and Miki survive? Find out at: Polar Bear Family and Me.

CITES Conference Headline News 

CITES
CITES (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It was also good to see that the CITES conference on endangered species made headline news in the United Kingdom.

It was helped in the U.K. by Prince William addressing the conference, following in a family tradition of supporting world wildlife and endangered species.

Some progress was made on elephant conservation, although there is still a lot to work on.

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Polar Bear, CITES Conference and Andy Warhol Animal Art

Hi, it’s Chris Packwolf, nature correspondent at the Greenygrey. I just read Marc Latham’s third article in his Suite 101 polar bear weekend: Polar Bear Family and Me: Summer. It sure was a great wildlife documentary series, and can’t wait to read the fourth and final article, which reliable sources tell me is planned for tomorrow.

rhino

Protecting Endangered Species

Talking of endangered species, I saw on the BBC news this morning that a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) conference starts this week.

The CITES conference hopes to agree global legislation to stop the mass slaughter of animals such as sharks, rhinos and elephants for unnecessary luxury items and unproved mythical medicines.

Andy Warhol Endangered Animals Art 

As I searched for an Independent article about CITES I saw an article about Andy Wolfhol’s human parallel (which is available from the above link). It reported that the Andy Warhol Foundation was selling his set of ten Endangered Animals screenprints created in 1983.

andy warhol frog

Unfortunately, there’s no wolf screenprint among the ten Andy Warhol animal artworks, but there is some greenygrey amongst our close cousins (as subtly seen above): elephant, frog, panda, eagle, tiger, butterfly, orangutan, zebra, rhinoceros and ram.

There’s only the hyena missing from the Life of Pi boat animals!

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Wolf or Human: Witch is Werewolf Better Half?

Hi, it’s Chris Packwolf, nature correspondent at the Greenygrey. We werewolves often debate the Big Questions about life, such as which/witch is our better half: human or wolf.

Polar Bear Squares
Polar Bear Squares (Photo credit: gehmflor)

Polar Bear Family and Me 

Polar bear
Polar bear (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

While the merits and faults of humans and wolves are sure to Bram Stoker up a heated debate in the Greenygrey world, we are usually in universal agreement that humans are more empathetic than polar bears.

This is because we watched the Polar Bear Family and Me, and read Marc Latham’s Natural World Media article about the series.

Polar Bears and Humanity Difference 

Ursus_maritimus_Polar_bear_with_cub.jpg, with ...
Ursus_maritimus_Polar_bear_with_cub.jpg, with color correction and cropping (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

While the polar bear family was shown to be very loving and caring of each other, they were obviously just trying to survive, and didn’t have the time or inclination to ‘care’ about other species.

Although humans are of course more destructive to the planet and other species overall, and polar bears make friends with huskies, some humans try to protect their animal competitors; and even those animal predators who threaten humanity, which might just lift  humanity above its predator competitors.

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Yellowstone Wolf Reintroduction Helps Beaver Biodiversity

Hi, it’s Harry Silhouetteof-Wolfhowlingonhill, television correspondent at the Greenygrey. I was delighted to see that the BBC‘s fascinating series, Nature’s Microworlds, recently had an episode about how wolves reintroduced to Yellowstone in the 1990s helped the oldest national park in the world’s river ecosystem return to its best state since wolves were exterminated in the 1920s.

28-365
28-365 (Photo credit: balaocat)

Yellowstone Wolves Benefit Beavers and Biodiversity

In Nature’s Microworlds‘ infotainment style, the Steve Backshall-narrated documentary took the viewer through several reasons why wolves might have helped beavers thrive; eliminating them one by one in a Sherlock Holmes-style deductive reasoning.

Nature
Nature (Photo credit: @Doug88888)

Was the key connection coyotes, bears, bison or elk?

Thankfully for us, Marc Latham has written a new article about it for his Suite 101 Natural World Media channel; including a Greenygrey image; and it provides a more in-depth account of the documentary; its information; and the key link between wolves and beavers that has helped to replenish Yellowstone’s riverbanks.

 

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Valentine Love Story Wolf Tragic Ending

Hi, it’s Greenygrey. Love is in the human air today as Valentine Day is celebrated. But it’s not only humans that exhibit love you know. I know because I am of course a werewolf, and know both my human and wolf sides.

Love Story Inspired Century of Animal Conservation

And one of the greatest love stories ever told; well, it was in fact real; was that of Lobo and Blanca, two wild wolves living in a time of change in the American West.

English: no original description
English: no original description (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

They eluded capture by ranchers for months, but Blanca was eventually trapped, and her scent used to trap her pining partner Lobo.

Valentine Story Ending and More Information

That wasn’t the end of the story. The tear-jerking broken-hearted ending to this famous wolf love story and more information are available in Marc Latham’s new Suite 101 Natural World Media article.

Illustration from Ernest Thompson Seton's Wild...
Illustration from Ernest Thompson Seton’s Wild Animals I Have Known (1898) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Although there wasn’t a happy ending for the Lobo and Blanca love story, their intelligence and devotion did turn their captor, Ernest Thompson Seton, into a wildlife and conservation advocate.

Moreover, the story of Lobo and Blanca he told inspired a Disney movie and BBC documentary; as well Sir David Attenborough, who has been producing groundbreaking wildlife documentaries for over half a century.

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