Tag Archives: animal welfare

Broccoli Kit Warms Up Werewolf of Oz Huskisson Episode

Hi, it’s Greenygrey. We’ve got a hat-trick of greenygrey great news this morning. stayt

Firstly, Charlie Stayt did the double with a lighter greenygrey look on the morning news this morning.

Broccoli Football Kit

Secondly, they also featured a greenygrey football kit symbolising green vegetables.

La Hoya Lorca are based in Murcia, which is known as “the vegetable garden of Spain“, so they wore the kit to honour the volumnous verdant veg in the region.

There is good and bad news about the kit. The good news is that it’s become known as a lucky kit after they won their league last season. The bad news is that it’s being nominated as the worst kit ever by a cruel media!

Photo: http://www.futbolbalear.es

The third great greenygrey news is that we have enough room for the first episode of the week of your favourite werewolf travels Australia to a Wizard of Oz theme travel quest epic comedy classic Werewolf of Oz: Fantasy Travel by Google Maps.

Link for Amazon book and kindle.

It’s not a big bumper epic episode, but it gets the journey back on course with some light-hearted husky comedy inspired by the town of Huskisson.

We’ve included a couple of funny husky – baby videos at the end: both for your enjoyment, and to show that huskies (and their ancestor wolves) are just as intelligent as humans – humans when they are vulnerable babies dependent on adult humans.

So we don’t think hunting animals such as wolves for pleasure is big, brave or intelligent!

Link for multiple Ereaders at Smashwords.
Link for multiple Ereaders at Smashwords.

Chapter 114.  Husky Son in Huskisson Hushes Us On

Elle took to the raft-pulling like a dolphin to water, and with a lighter load on a calmed sea we reached similar speeds to the previous day. It felt refreshing to be back amongst the waves, alternating between waterworld and skyspace, although I was still missing Barry and family of course.

Huskisson has Potent Pull 

We reached Jervis Bay in the evening, and thought about stopping somewhere for a meal.

As we circled the bay from the left, Vincentia didn’t draw us in, but Huskisson seemed to have a certain pull.

Mooning in Moona Moona

We were preparing to land near Elizabeth Drive, on the junction with Moona Moona Creek, when a car full of women stopped at a nearby junction.

The driver mooned at us twice. Her front-seat passenger berated her, ‘Elizabeth, will you stop mooning or we’ll be up the Creek without a paddle; there’s a husky father and son just over there. Elizabeth, drive on now.’

The husky son just chuckled, and hushed us on.

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Tom Hardy in Africa, Thomas Hardy on Class

Hi, it’s Chris Packwolf, animal welfare correspondent at the Greenygrey; with Chris Packham a parallel for those reading this in the human world. As wolf week takes over from working-class week, yesterday the Greenygrey reported how Gemma Atkinson is a working-class woman animal welfare supporter and environmentally conscious. Tom Hardy stars today.

Atypical Animal Welfare Supporters 

Tom Hardy
Tom Hardy (Photo credit: honeyfitz)

Gemma is probably not the stereotypical animal welfare supporter, and neither is the actor Tom Hardy. Hardy is best known for being a bad boy celebrity, and playing baddie roles such as Bronson and Bane; as told in his biography. Bri’s bane was of course the ultimate Brisbane baddie at the end of Werewolf of Oz.

However, Tom Hardy this week starred in a documentary visiting Africa to report on the struggle to save elephants and rhinos from poachers in the first of the two-part Poaching Wars With Tom Hardy.

Use of Iconic Logos

lacoste
lacoste (Photo credit: Ozzam Escudero Ajihil)

Although it would be nice to raise awareness using just the animals, I think it sometimes needs stars and icons to attract new supporters. That’s why we have the greenygrey wolf as the logo for the Greenygrey website.

We could have chosen a less controversial animal, but felt that the wolf was right; and Lacoste hasn’t done too bad with the crocodile, which of course starred in the Werewolf of Oz pirate story. Crocodiles seem even less popular and iconic an animal to humans than our best friend dog’s close wild cousin.

Being True to Oneself 

"Thomas Hardy," oil on panel, by the...
“Thomas Hardy,” oil on panel, by the Scottish painter and engraver William Strang. 17 in. x 15 in. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Remembering working-class week and Tom Hardy above, the Greenygrey’s struggle between the human and wild animal world is reminiscent of Tom Hardy’s Victorian namesake writer Thomas Hardy’s struggle with class identity.

Thomas Hardy the writer found it difficult to live in upper class life after becoming a successful writer, and felt he would have to lose some of his good working-class qualities to be accepted into the upper echelons; where he would be able to fulfill his literary potential.

Working-Class Animal Welfare

I remember hearing a jokey observation that when the upper classes see a fox they hunt it; when the working-class see a fox they hit it on the head and eat it; when the middle-class see a fox they photograph it.

So although I am a working-class werewolf, in that respect I am more stereotypically middle-class.

Kes 1969 film poster.jpg
Kes’s 1969 film poster

Although vegetarianism and animal welfare support are more typically middle-class I do it out of a liking for animals and the environment rather than social factors. In fact, life would be much easier, and I would probably be more acceptable in my current life, if I did eat meat and not care so much about animals.

And in reality, I think animal lovers cross class and cultural boundaries. An early fictional example of a working-class person finding an interest in life through animals was Kes, a Ken Loach film adapted from the Barry Hines book A Kestrel for a Knave.

Whether it’s kestrels in Britain or elephants in Africa, the Greenygrey totally supports the efforts of animal welfare supporters to try and protect endangered animals for both the animals and humans; the world will be a much poorer place without all the animal species that brighten it with life.

Marc Latham has books available on Smashwords and Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/author/marclatham).

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Brian May of Queen an Animal Advocate

Moanin' in the Moonlight
Moanin’ in the Moonlight (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hi, it’s Howlin’ Wolf, music correspondent at the Greenygrey. I was delighted to see on Planet Rock News that Brian May wants to be remembered first and foremost as an animal advocate. He is quoted as saying in an interview with the Sunday Times:

“When I’m gone, people will no doubt remember me for Queen, but I would much rather be remembered for attempting to change the way we treat our fellow creatures… I suppose I’ve lived a crazy life, and watching wildlife brings back a sense of tranquility… People know about the astrophysics, but I love gardening, too, and I’ve always been passionate about the welfare of our wonderful British wildlife.”

Here’s Brian doing a great impression of our very own Grey:

MANDATORY CREDIT PHOTO BY DAVE M. BENETT/GETTY...
MANDATORY CREDIT PHOTO BY DAVE M. BENETT/GETTY IMAGES REQUIRED) Brian May signs copies of ’40 Years Of Queen’ featuring an introduction by himself and Roger Taylor of Queen during the book launch party on October 3, 2011 in London, England. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)
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Pedigree Dogs and Wild Wolves: the Truth

English: The Gibbon wolf pack pauses in the sn...
Image via Wikipedia

Hi, it’s Harry Silhouetteof-Wolfhowlingonhill. Last night there was a good but sad documentary about how pedigree dogs have been bred into deformity by decades of human engineering. Pedigree Dogs Exposed: Three Years On showed how dogs’ skulls and bones have been changed into totally different shapes in under a century; like an evolution of convenience for humanity’s vision, rather than the animal’s health. The dogs have trouble living a normal life, and even breathing in some cases. It’s available on BBC iplayer in the UK; don’t know about other availability: http://www.bbc.co.uk/i/b01cqp75/

Also, tonight at 10 on BBC4 there’s a Natural World documentary on the Wolf Pack (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0078ps7). I think I’ve seen it before, and it’s a warts n’ all documentary, so not all good for wolves, but is a balanced look at the wolf and how it really lives (unlike the wolfophobia of The Grey film!).

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Eagle Poem about Spirit Animals, Dreams and our shared Environment

Eagle
Image by Moosealope via Flickr

Marc Latham’s latest poem is about those that inspire dreams in the sky; as well as the increasing danger to wildlife from a human population that has just grown by a billion to 7b in little over a decade, and with some leading thinkers calling for the West to race with China’s uncontrolled building program.

Although it is of course understandable that individual people and collective societies want to acquire a decent standard of living, or protect the one they already have.  Here’s the poetry:

Eagle Down

Imagination inspiration
preparing breakfast
over fantastic spread
swoops downstairs

through unknown tunnel

oncoming traffic
clips resplendent wings
spirit grounded
broken dreamcatcher

Hunting Animals and Conserving Species

Today’s poem mirrors Prince Philip’s paradoxical role as conservation champion and huntsman; one side of his character seemingly enjoying the saving of animals’ lives and the other taking them.

Prince Philip Walks a Fine Line

Animal activists want to protect critters and resist hunters
they say it’s cruel and barbaric

Prince Philip protects some animals and kills others

there’s a long tradition of sport
Hunters want to resist animal activists and kill critters