Tag Archives: Channel Four

Paralympics Opening Ceremony and Horizon Universe Documentary

Hi, it’s Stephen Wolfing, science correspondent at the Greenygrey. Watching Channel Four, I was thrilled to see that my human version in the parallel universe planet Earth thingy, Stephen Hawking, opened the London Paralympics 2012 last night, with an inspiring message about reaching for the stars.

The opening ceremony went on to provide lots of fun, moving and spectacular displays, including some greenygrey ones:

Horizon: Mapping the Universe

The opening ceremony’s emphasis on science and space was nicely timed after the BBC‘s Horizon this week covered the attempts being made to make a 3-D map of the universe, and the current theories on the size and contents of the universe or universes.

Amongst many things, it thoroughly explained how our understanding of the observable universe is limited to what light has had time to reach us, and that galaxies are not moving away from each other; the gaps between galaxies are widening because the universe is still expanding.

It ended by showing how the universe is thought to be infinite, and could be one of an infinite number of such universes.

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Two-Sided Arguments are Too Long-winded?

Grey Area
Image by the justified sinner via Flickr

Did this image foresee the arrival of the greenygrey into the grey area debate?

Hi, it’s Susie Dentinfang, word expert at the Greenygrey and Countdown to the Full Moon.

Nearly a full moon ago, I started defining the word greenygrey for its place in human prosperity.  That time, I focused on upgrading the term ‘grey area’ to a ‘greenygrey area’.

Today, as promised then, I will be looking at how greenygrey can be substituted for a ‘two-sided argument’.

Greenygrey has More Rhythm and Flow

While it could be argued that greenygrey is a clumsier term than ‘grey area’, having three syllables to two if my calculations are correct (I’m not the mathematician!), there is no doubt that it is a much smoother and flowing term than ‘two-sided argument’.

I would much rather say, ‘It’s a bit greenygrey’ than ‘It’s a bit of a two-sided argument’, although I am rather biased.

So, Greenygrey it shall be

So, I think I have conclusively proved that theory, and greenygrey should take the place of ‘two-sided argument’ from now on, wherever possible.

Please try and be subtle during the transition, and consider the feelings of any staunch two-sided argumentists.

Returning to the Grey Area

And returning to the grey area, in this age of abbreviation, maybe the use of GG would make it shorter and smoother than ‘grey area’.  Example: ‘Yes, but that’s GG’ is shorter than ‘Yes, but that’s a grey area’.

I won’t claim victory on that one just yet, but I think I have made great strides towards bringing the two-sided argument, uh, I mean greenygrey, to a conclusive conclusion.

The splitting of greenygrey into greenygrey and GG will also differentiate the two uses of greenygrey, so there isn’t any confusion about which old term the greenygrey/GG is replacing.

Thank you for your time!

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Green Thinking about Identity

Optical illusion. Both circles and both square...
Image via Wikipedia

In the above image, both squares and circles are really the same colours.

Hi, it’s Green.  I was catching up with Grey’s latest Werewolf of blogs, and read that it saw a television documentary called The Code, and that it made Grey wonder if green and grey are dominant colours in nature and the human mind.

We are still rebuilding communications with Oz, so cannot bring the blogs into the Greenygrey world at the current time.

Horizon: What is Colour, and How does it Influence?

No sooner had I read that, than I read an article by our ol’ buddy, Marc Latham, on Suite 101, about a Horizon documentary that had the latest research on how colour is created and how it influences us.

It theorises that colour is subjective and influenced by society and language. Colour can also influence our moods and behaviour.  I’m happy to say that green is usually considered good by the human mind, with red its negative opposite.

The programme is available until September 19th on the BBC website, but I don’t know if it’s available in your human world country.