Tag Archives: chaos theory

Euro 2012 Chaotic Chaos Theory Round-up

Hi, it’s Martin ‘Werewolfie’ Adams. It sure seems a long time ago when I last reported on Euro 2012. Why, as I remember it we were hoping for an all-greenygrey goalie quarter-final between the two Gs: Germany and Greece.

Euro 2012 Quarter-Final Chaos: Germany v Greece

Chaos in the German goal as un-greenygrey goalie beaten to the ball in rare Greek attack.

We were expecting the two greenygrey goalies to provide a very normal game, with perhaps one or two goals. But then the German goalie was kitted out in bright orange. This resulted in a six-goal thriller, with the German goalie leaving in two goals for the first time in the tournament. I was at a loss to explain how all that happened, so I asked our resident science expert, Stephen Wolfing; he thought it looked like the butterfly effect of chaos theory:

‘The butterfly effect of chaos theory proposes that a small change in one place can result in large differences to a later state, and I think that is what happened in the Germany v Greece quarter-final. Germany decided to kit their goalie out in orange, and that small change created chaos in the later game.’

Wow, thank you Stephen, for your clear and concise explanation. I had not imagined it would be so simple, and yet quite complex at the same time.

England v Italy: Did England Pay for non-Greenygrey Goalie Kit

The other quarter-final with a greenygrey interest was England v Italy; well, it was until England decided to send poor Joe Hart out in the all red kit instead of the greenygrey.

Hart seemed to be like a red rag to a bull as the Italians charged his goal time after time. And then, in the penalties, Hart was unable to save any.

Would he have done any better in greenygrey. Not even chaos theory can answer that one…!

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Chaos and Order Within the Poetry Universe

This ‘poem’ derives from the Secret Life of Chaos documentary that was recently on the BBC.

I thought the documentary describing recurring patterns and nature reporting back to itself fitted quite nicely with the Folding Mirror theme, so I created this ‘poem’.

The programme showed how a process known as self-similarity means that nature replicates itself in ever smaller identical patterns known as fractals. Some examples of this are body organs, tree branches, or river systems.

The documentary also talked about how chaos means that even simple mathematical equations describing natural events that should work perfectly are never foolproof, and it is this ‘chaos’ that creates change over time. Humanity is thought to have been evolving for over 3 billion years.

In line with the idea of order being thrown into chaos and change happening as a consequence, the second ‘half’ of the whole poem, below the middle line, has been changed slightly to the top half. Can you spot the change?

The Poem

The Secret Life of Chaos

self-similarity replicates at every size level it wants
fractal property the same on all scales
body organs and rivers to the universe
patterns spreading out in repetition
complex systems rely on simple mathematical equations
in the loop of nature life reports back to itself from its environment
in the loop of nature life reports back to itself from its environment
complex systems rely on simple mathematical equations
patterns spreading out in repetition
body organs and rivers to the universe
fractal property the same on all scales
self-similarity replicates at every size level it wants

evolutionary tweeks gradually mutate life and form

self-similarity replicates at every size level
fractal property the same on all scales
body organs and rivers to the universe
patterns spreading out in repetition
complex systems rely on simple mathematical equations
in the loop of nature life reports back to itself from its environment
in the loop of nature life reports back to itself from its environment
complex systems rely on simple mathematical equations
patterns spreading out in repetition
body organs and rivers to the universe
fractal property the same on all scales
self-similarity replicates at every size level


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