Tag Archives: fantasy travel

Sunday Paper of Comedy – Fantasy Blogs

Hi, it’s Greenygrey. It’s been a (busy) week since the last Werewolf of Oz episode, so here’s another one. It’s quite a long episode, but there’s a punchline at the end, and lots of interesting and funny dialogue in the body of the blog.

This is a standalone episode, with little relevance for the main Werewolf of Oz plot, which reaches a totally thrilling conclusion tying together many of the threads from Grey’s epic journey. This is not one of them though.

However, this episode shows the growing relationship between Grey and Bonzo, while giving you the reader a light comedy break in this epic fantasy classic; the first solo(ish) expedition across Oz by Google maps, undertaken by our very own googler Grey. As you will see, Grey and Bonzo visit the Kakadu National Park, with the plot revolving around the city of Darwin and the town of Humpty Doo. Enjoy!

25.  HUMPTY DOO AND THE QUACK I do IN KAKADU

We departed Nitmiluk in the morning, warmly encased in our BOGOL jumpers. Bonzo said he felt limitlessly lucky, and there seemed no limits to our progress on the path, as we reached the Kakadu National Park in no time.

Sunset at the Doo
Sunset at the Doo (Photo credit: Rantz)

Nice Surprise at Alligator Wildman

Bonzo and I freshened up at the waterfall where the Wildman and Alligator rivers meet, as we didn’t fancy meeting the Wildman or Alligator on their own; our consensus theory was that they’d be too pre-occupied with each other at the waterfall to take any notice of us. 

We were just emerging from the water when an extraordinary looking creature arrived on the beach. Its head reminded me of my ol’ hero Scooby Doo, but it seemed to have an egg body like that of Humpty Dumpty.

It was accompanied by a duck that always seemed to be whistling.

Ready for the Quack I Do in Kakadu?

The duck approached us and whistled, ‘Hello, I am Dr. Darwin, a local whistler duck quack, and this is my friend, the Humpty Doo, who also lives nearby. We have ventured east to Kakadu hoping to discover new species. We thought you might be of some interest, but we have concluded that you are both old species. Although there hasn’t been a werewolf seen in these parts for many a century.’

English: A male northern brushtail possum in H...
English: A male northern brushtail possum in Humpty Doo, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I returned the greeting, and thanked them for their interest, before saying I’d never seen a Humpty Doo before. Dr. Darwin said Humpty was an interesting creature, and he wasn’t sure how he’d evolved; it was ongoing research, but his theory on the origin of species was that the Humpty Doo was descended from an English civil war rhyme and a Hollywood cartoon dog.

So maybe I was right. I was excited, and asked if it really believed this. For the first time it did not whistle its opinion; instead it did quack, ‘I do.’

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Notes

Darwin and Humpty Doo are Northern Territories towns.
Scooby Doo (cartoon dog).
Humpty Dumpty (English civil war nursery rhyme character).
Charles Darwin (19th century scientist, and his book: On The Origin of Species).

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Werewolf of Oz Digital Book Disclaimer

Hi, it’s the Greenygrey. In this second instalment of the Werewolf of Oz: Fantasy Travel by Google Maps book on this blog we have the disclaimer.

dISCLAIMER

This book is a work of fictional parody. While it features real people and places, they are taken out of their real context and transported to the fantasy world of Oz via Google maps for this exploratory expedition into comedy fantasy – magic realism virtual travelling. Only the author has had anything to do with the creation of this book. Apologies to people and places that do not think they are portrayed positively, but it is obviously fictional, and hopefully this book will create further interest in them.

The book is written from an agnostic viewpoint. Some of the material may offend religious extremists, so they are advised not to read any further. The book also contains sections involving alcoholic beverages: good times are balanced with bad.

One of the reasons the writer chose Australia; the main one is of course that its nickname, Oz, ties in with the Wizard of Oz; for this journey was because he thought Australians would appreciate the humour. It was written with fondness and respect for Australia; a country where the author spent most of 1989.

The book consciously provides a positive anthropomorphic view of animals, and especially the wolf. It is hoped that, in some small way, this might help the remaining wild animals in the world survive a little longer by raising awareness. Despite providing us with our ‘best friend’ dog, the wolf has suffered a particularly negative image in human cultures alienated from the wilderness. This has resulted in the wolf’s persecution and extinction in many regions of the world.

 Copyright © 2012 by Marc Latham

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

This book contains material protected under International and Federal Copyright Laws and Treaties. No part of this book should be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system without acknowledging its source. If you could also tell the author it would be appreciated.

marc@greenygrey.co.uk

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Werewolf of Oz latest Episode not Real Time

English: Nanny Goat Bronze Statue Nanny Goat H...
Image via Wikipedia

Hi, it’s Green.  Great news, we’ve received Grey’s Werewolf of Oz blog clearly into the Greenygrey world for the first time since the Grand Council coup attempt, and have copied it below for quick reading.

Some people have asked why we can’t produce real time Greenygrey news, but we aren’t even real, so how can we create real time news!?

Here’s the blog, which had the title:

Goodbye Coo Pigeons, Hello Banjo Badgers

The pigeon mothers of Cooma put on a fine feast for us, and we thanked them with full contented stomachs that rumbled no more.  They said it was the least they could do, after we’d showed their Coorow relatives the utmost respect.

Tara to Cooma

They put us up in some lofts they’d converted for our visit; there was even a longer one for Elle, and a smaller one for Angry.

In the morning they cooked us up some pigeon porridge, which they call pigidge.  It was made with goat’s milk, and was oat so delicious.

But then it came time to say goodbye, and we left Cooma with a heavy heart and stomach.

We could hear them cooing their farewells until we entered deepest Badja State Forest, and the chattering of badgers took over.

Banjo Badgers of Badja Forest

It was nice to walk through the thick forest at first, but then we reached the swamps, and it looked like it could get tricky.

We were looking for a clear route through when Angry said he thought he could  hear a banjo being played in the distance.

We thought he’d turned more crazy than angry for a minute, but then we could all hear it.

We followed the direction of the sound, and before long our lugs delivered us to a clearing, where we could see a badger picking at its banjo.  Angry pulled out his guitar and started playing along, and soon they were raising the canopy with their badger beats.

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