Tag Archives: pop art sunrise

pop art photos penultimate week of mym 20/21

Yesterday’s sunrise at 6.30 was a greenYgrey one:

Compared to Week and Fortnight Earlier

The sunrise (really: our first view of the sun as our planet spins) has now reached the last landmark on the Leeds panorama; three university buildings in the north of the city), a little more north than March 6th (taken last year: cranes to the north now gone. In this year’s photos, the tree has now grown to block that gap where sun rising!):

And a lot more than February 28th this year:

5 new pop art + 2 comparitive science

The sunrise has now passed the pylon, and rises behind it.

This morning’s sunrise, compared to the last one photographed, on January 31st:

The sun is in a similar position to October 25th, mistYmuse false dawn week, just before the hour went back to end BST:

It’ll probably rise across the top like that in a couple of days.

caught crepuscular rays weave winged words

I have proposed POP theory;
think I’ve proved sunrise can be pinky,
but it is for others to study it rigorously.

There was another clear sunrise today, and I was awake, but decided not to photograph it as I took some yesterday. While some may consider me an extremist or fanatic for what I have recorded, for true scientific sunrise/twilight research, every one would have to be recorded for hours, from first light to bright sky.

Maybe there is someone doing that: to distinguish the colours, and how cloud forms in different parts of the sky, and how they interact? Or maybe there will be…

Here’s three photos from the previous time I took some previous to yesterday’s, on January 26th, when pre-dawn pulsating pinky penetrated a mostly cloudy morning, with a band of yellowy orange in the middle of it, like POP with purple on the end; the grey sky looks purplish in the cropped last photo.

They also show how an edit can change the scene. I think they have a different colour to yesterday’s set.

Regarding the post title, I was listening to Solstafir while writing the post, with the name apparently meaning crepuscular rays.