Tag Archives: Research

The Brain has Grown and Folded: All in the Mind

Hi, it’s Stephen Wolfing, science correspondent at the Greenygrey. Greenygrey in the human world was totally separate from the Folding Mirror poetry form when the two concepts emerged five years ago. However, through research and new discoveries the two fields have converged over the last half-decade.

Mind Is Not Brain
Mind Is Not Brain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In the natural world and human architecture there are many examples of greenygrey folding mirrors, such as horizons and reflections.

Greenygrey All in the Mind

The Greenygrey in the human mind is most easily defined as a kind of bipolar schizophrenia: the division of the mind into at least two separate parts; more vertical than horizontal.

Meanwhile, the Folding Mirror poetry form divides two halves of poetry with a middle line: more horizontal than vertical.

English: Unlimited Potential of the Human Mind

The Greenygrey concept has therefore provided a lot of conceptual material for Folding Mirror poems.

Physical Evidence of Folding Brain Folds to Fit Skull

While the Greenygrey is only a concept when it comes to the human brain, the actual physical matter is called Gyri (ridges) and Sulci (crevices), and it has folded itself to fit into our skulls.

Apparently, if the brain was unwrapped it would be the size of a pillowcase.

Gyrisulci doesn’t seem that far off the Greenygrey to me!

Marc Latham drew this self-portrait of what he suspected to be an ADHD mind around about the conception time of the Greenygrey and Folding Mirror poetry form:

adhdMind

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Wolf in the House: Cute not Killer

Hi, it’s Harry Silhouetteof-Wolfhowlingonthehill. Our blog about the demonisation of the ‘big bad wolf’ on Celebrity Big Brother the other day got me thinking. So I searched for an old BBC Horizon documentary I saw called The Secret Lives of Dogs.

Wolf in the House on Documentary

The video featured footage from a research experiment in Hungary. Wolves were reared in a house, and they tried to train them like dogs.

They found that by 8 weeks the wolves were different. The wolves had their own ideas, and didn’t listen to orders. The nurturing didn’t work.

But the wolves weren’t nasty or dangerous, they were just disruptive and uncontrollable.

The footage lasts on this video from about 3:30 minutes to 7:50 minutes. The wolf coverage is preceded by a clever collie. After the wolf coverage it is shown how a group of foxes were tamed over a long period of time, and I’ll discuss that tomorrow.

Poem about Future Research into Past, Above and Below

Look into the Future
Image via Wikipedia
Marc Latham’s latest Folding Mirror poem was inspired by the thought that a lot of our future knowledge acquisition in space and humanities will probably be through increased discoveries of past events.
In space, scientists are trying to trace the universe back in time as far as they can, and to the Big Bang if possible.  While in the humanities, we will no doubt have a better understanding of our world and ancient cultures if we find more evidence; most of this is probably underground at the moment.
The poem title more or less reverses the Back to the Future film title.  Here it is:
Future to the Back 
Space researchers focusing on
finding beginning
trying to catch
the big bang above us
stretching time
epic riddling rhyme
spinning standing still
an incomplete puzzle
earthly knowledge
pieces buried in sandy sea
stones and fossils
history unearthed
bring knowledge paradigm shifts

Article Citing Research Linking Biological and Political Development

Proteasome
Image via Wikipedia

World Science has just published an article featuring research finding that political development has a similar structure to that found in biological systems.  It ties in nicely with the Time Stands Still poem recently published to this site.

It also has an article about butterflies treating their young, which is relevant for the ant theory poetry previously featured on the site.

Thanks to World Science and the researchers for the info, and you for visiting.  Have a great weekend!