Tag Archives: stars

May Poem Mirrors Spring Season with Southern Cross Stars

May is here
spring for sure
in northern hemisphere
winter sheds last tear
as summer knocks on door.

Hi, it’s William Wolfsworth, poetry correspondent at the Greenygrey. I hope you didn’t mind my poetic introduction. Spring is in the air, and it’s time for wolfwords to leave the lair.

Poetry Reflections

I’m delighted to report that we’ve imported Marc Latham’s newest Folding Mirror poem into the Greenygrey world to accompany reflection 10 from 242 Mirrror Poems and Reflections.

Smashwords cover

 

 

 

 
Here’s the reflection followed by the new poem from fmpoetry.wordpress.com. There’s more information on that site, as well as a couple of different images.

Reflection 10

In the void between life and death
that’s where I like to be.
Flying in space beyond sight
of reality and mortality.
But the flight is finite,
and the return can be rocky.

..       Spending the Spring night in the Foot...

Height of Spring, Stars order Heart

May
spring finale
after the April March
of vulgar life
colourful language
screaming buds
making a scene
open armed
waving skywards
in the northern hemisphere

do the dandelions dance, like leopards in love

in the southern semi-circle
where stars
cross lines
creating a shape
sun’s relative
universal code
changes over time
above Delta Acrux Mimosa
red giant
Gacrux

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Poem Mirrors May Spring with Crux Stars

Marc Latham’s newest Folding Mirror poem celebrates spring’s warmest month in the northern hemisphere, as it prepares to hand over to summer. It is mirrored in the bottom half by the Crux (Southern Cross) star constellation, which has four main stars (although there is a fifth prominent one), as there are four seasons in many northern hemisphere countries and regions.

Learning from Poetry

One of the most fascinating facts learnt during research for the poem was that Crux was visible as far north as Britain until the fourth millennium BC. As explained on Wikipedia, ‘the precession of the equinoxes gradually lowered its stars below the European horizon, and they were eventually forgotten by the inhabitants of northern latitudes.

File:Deep Crux wide field with fog.jpg
Crux constellation on Wikipedia

Height of Spring, Stars order Heart

May
spring finale
after the April March
of vulgar life
colourful language
screaming buds
making a scene
open armed
waving skywards
in the northern hemisphere

do the dandelions dance, like leopards in love

in the southern semi-circle
where stars
cross lines
creating a shape
sun’s relative
universal code
changes over time
above Delta Acrux Mimosa
red giant
Gacrux

File:Southern cross appearing on a number of flags.PNG

Smashwords cover

Werewolf of Oz Returns: with not much Changed!

Hi, it’s Greenygrey. As Mr. Wolfhol said yesterday, all the sport over the past three weeks has provided a break for some of our regular features. Why, we haven’t posted a new episode of the Werewolf of Oz: Fantasy Travel by Google Maps for a while.

World Record Blog Pause?

It’s been such a long time it could be a (human) world record for a blog story pause? We’d like to say it was a carefully planned strategy to increase the tension of Grey’s nightmares, but to tell you the truth, we just haven’t got around to blogging it, as we’ve had so much else to write about.

Yes, that’s the advantage of a blog I suppose, that we can just stop and start the story whenever; and hopefully it has increased the impact and enjoyment for regular Werewolf of Oz readers. If it was in a book we’d have had to leave several pages empty, wasting paper; or in a film leave a blank screen for several minutes, and you’d probably have left the cinema! Maybe you have lost interest though, or never had any. We’ll probably never know…

Anyway, we’re back to Greenygrey’s Rambles, which was a completely different tale, so here’s the latest Werewolf of Oz episode:

11.  IS BRITAIN SUNNY NOW? GREY DREAMS AND NIGHTMARES

I seemed to sleep for an age. I dreamt the Greenygrey world was sunny all the time now I wasn’t there, and everything lived joyously under neverending blue skies. I envisaged Blighty being so brighty that stars dropped to Earth in the form of birds to re-energise their glows amongst the overabundance of sparkling effervescence.

Six pointed Star of Birds
Six pointed Star of Birds (Photo credit: zeevveez)

I also wondered if my other half Green had forgotten me already, and joined with blue and yellow, which are after all its constituent colours.

Yellow Green & Blue [Friday Flickr Photo Collage]
Yellow Green & Blue [Friday Flickr Photo Collage] (Photo credit: LethaColleen)
And what about my lookalike. Was it connected to me, or was it another me? Was there a message I should understand? Bird-brain or going insane, it all seemed such a pain.

I awoke feeling sick and soaked in sweat. It was all still a mystery.

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The Observable Universe may be One Amazing Space among Many

Hi, it’s Stephen Wolfing, science expert at the Greenygrey. It’s hard to imagine, but the night-sky you see only contains a miniscule amount of what is actually in space around us. This was emphasised by a photo in an article on the Matador Network.

Amount of Galaxies in Space is Astounding

The article about telescopes by Hal Amen featured an image by the Hubble telescope showing an area in space a tenth the diameter of the full moon as we see it from Earth. They found 10,000 galaxies in the image. If that random part of space is typical, then there are 100 billion galaxies in the observable universe.

Our Milky Way galaxy is one amongst billions, as our sun is one star amongst billions and our planet one amongst billions; with many exo-planets and moons thought to be ideal for harbouring life. This image shows our sun’s position in our galaxy:


Image from the Atlas of the Universe website.

Beyond the Observable Universe

Although our brains and technology have obviously not seen what is beyond the observable universe, scientists have some theories. Martin Rees believes that we may be one universe among many. He proposed this in an article on the Prospect website, which began and ended with these paragraphs:

An astonishing concept has entered mainstream cosmological thought: physical reality could be hugely more extensive than the patch of space and time traditionally called “the universe.” We’ve learnt that we live in a solar system that is just one planetary system among billions, in one galaxy among billions. But there are signs that a further Copernican demotion confronts us. The entire panorama that astronomers can observe could be a tiny part of the aftermath of our Big Bang, which is itself just one bang among a potentially infinite ensemble. In this grander perspective, what we’ve traditionally called the laws of nature may be no more than parochial bylaws—local manifestations of “bedrock” laws that must be sought at a still deeper level.

Our cosmic environment could be richly textured, but on scales so vast that our purview is restricted to a tiny fragment. We’re not directly aware of the big picture, any more than a plankton whose universe is a litre of water would be aware of the world’s topography and biosphere. It is sensible for cosmologists to start off by exploring the simplest models. But there is no more reason to expect simplicity on the grandest scale than in the terrestrial environment, where intricate complexity prevails. It is exhilarating that this wonderful concept is now within the scope of scientific enquiry.

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