Tag Archives: wolf names

Berry Fun Oz Werewolf Episode for Wolf Environmental Week

Hi, it’s Rudi Skollpack, fresh new food and drink correspondent at the Greenygrey for wolf – animal welfare and environment – week at the Greenygrey. My closest human parallel is famous award winning vegetarian chef Eddie Shepherd. My names are derived from the famous wolf names:

  1. Rudi: famed wolf abbreviation of Rudolph.
  2. Skoll: a wolf that chased the sun.
  3. Pack: collective noun for a group of wolves.

Berry Fun Werewolf of Oz Episode 

Berridale Brae hairpin - geograph.org.uk - 162192
Berridale Brae hairpin – geograph.org.uk – 162192 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Today we have the 100th episode of Werewolf of Oz: Fantasy Travel by Google Maps. It’s not only a landmark episode, but also a timely one for environmental week at the Greenygrey, as it’s full of berry comedy and wordplay.

The episode sees the travel quest quartet leaving Smiggin Holes, and starting to head north towards the epic Brisbane fun finale. Reaching Berridale sets the tone for the episode.

It ends up so full of berryment that I don’t feel the need to add any more of my own, apart from berryment for merriment above, so I hope you enjoyed my first blog, and don’t think I made a meal of it!

Chapter 100.  Australia’s Greytest Travellers Reach the Capital 

Berridale Braes - geograph.org.uk - 162297
Berridale Braes – geograph.org.uk – 162297 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We left Smiggin Holes where it was, and headed east on the dust sandy path. I thought we’d left the Lord of the Rings influence behind, but that turned out to be nonsense, because I was reminded of it again when we stopped for supper: a berry dal in Berridale.

Can Berryer in Canberra

We were berry impressed with the berries in the dal, and it made us all feel much berrter after our Smiggin Holes ordeal. So we thought we’d try to go beyond the pain berryer; searching for more berries even if it meant a long endurance journey. Angry suggested trying Canberra, as he thought we could berryer there. And you know what, he was right, you can berryer in Canberra. It didn’t take long before we were berrying an incrediberryble amount of berries into our bellies. I don’t know what type the Canberra berries were; maybe cranberries with the r left out.

Missing Dairymans Plains Makes My Mind Complains 

Dairyman's Plain
Dairyman’s Plain (Photo credit: SplaTT)

We headed back down south once our berry ballooned bellies felt balanced, but we made slow progress; because we took along some sloe berries. However, the sloe berries did satisfy my desire for more berries and set my mind at rest; because prior to berrying them, I’d been regretting our decision not to detour to Dairymans Plains, as it sounded good for a raspberry ripple.

It was getting late as we approached Cooma.

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Notes

Dale is a region and battle in Lord of the Rings.
Dal is an Indian food pulse dish.
Berry language: berry – very, berrter – better, pain berryer – pain barrier, can berryer – Canberra, berrying – burying, incrediberryable – incredible.
Berridale, Dairymans Plains and Cooma are real places. Canberra is Australia’s capital.

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Carl Froch: and other Great British Lone Wolves

Hi, it’s Martin ‘Werewolfie’ Adams, sports correspondent at the Greenygrey. The killers of Lee Rigby continue to be called lone wolves, even though it’s becoming increasingly clear they were not acting alone; adding to the fact that there were two of them anyway!

If anyone was a lone wolf it was Lee Rigby, who was alone and defenceless against humans with lots of weapons.

Although this is trivial compared to Rigby’s loss, we believe we must try and lift gloom to spirit at the Greenygrey, and using humour is one way.

 Wolf Epithets are Usually Used Negatively 

Lone Wolf the Younger, Kiowa
Lone Wolf the Younger, Kiowa (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wolf epithets are usually used negatively in modern monotheistic society, whereas in pagan societies they were considered an honour to be achieved.

She-wolves for competitive women is another one; as used by Helen Castor in a book about queens who fought for power; adapted to a BBC history series. Some strong ambitious women might hopefully look on it as a positive epithet though?

The same is true for lone-wolf. It could be used positively or negatively, but is usually used negatively; most often in terrorism cases these days it seems.

It could also be used for sportspeople, such as boxers and athletes, who have to train alone for long periods, and then try to outlast their opponents; as wolves often hunt by endurance.

British boxer Carl Froch
British boxer Carl Froch (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At the Greenygrey we like the wolf boxers rather than than the gazelles; and in athletics we like runners who lead from the front, reminiscent of endurance wolves rather than cheetah sprinters (we like gazelles and cheetahs too!).

Carl Froch and Amir Khan: Worthy of Wolfdom 

Carl Froch proved himself worthy of wolfdom last night when he wore down his opponent Mikkel Kessler, fighting more like a wolf than his original epithet of cobra. Kessler had won their first meeting in Denmark, and both fighters put on another great fight.

English: Amir Khan champion Boxer and future b...
English: Amir Khan. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We particularly like Froch at the Greenygrey, because he looks quite wolflike, with his big eyes and big nose; like our ol’ pal Marc Latham. He also fights like a brave wolf, and diligently trains to keep himself at wolflike endurance.

We therefore bestow on Carl Froch the first Greenygrey honourable lone wolf name: Canis Froch. The scientific name for a wolf is canis lupus.

We also consider Amir Khan worthy of wolfdom, after doing Britain proud in the Athens 2004 Olympics, and having some great boxing battles in his professional career; and having a big nose. We bestow on him the honourable lone wolf name Amir Canis.

Paula Radcliffe and Kelly Holmes: Worthy of Wolfdom 

Radcliffe at the 2011 Berlin marathon.
Radcliffe at the 2011 Berlin marathon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For women worthy of wolfdom we must move to the sport of athletics, although Nicola Adams proved she had the potential to be a great she-lone-wolf at the London 2012 Olympics.

Paula Radcliffe never managed to win Olympic gold, but was a great runner who won the World Championships and broke the world record several times. She also  liked to lead from the front, wearing her opponents down with lone wolf endurance from early in a race. We bestow on her the honourable lone wolf name of Paula Radcanis.

And last but not least, Kelly Holmes liked to lead from the front going into the home straight, reminiscent of Cathy leading from the front as the Werewolf of Ozzers enter the final straight of their epic Ozyssey. We bestow on her the honourable lone wolf name of Kelly Dens.

Kelly on her lap of honour after winning the 1...
Kelly on her lap of honour after winning the 1500m final (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I hope none of them come hunting for my job now!

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